​​​The Funeral Consumers Advocacy

of London and Windsor​​

the funeral.So... Where do I put my funeral arrangements? The more people who have copies of your arrangements, the more likely you are to have what you want. You can choose to give copies to your next­-of-­kin (preferably to more than one), your executor, your family doctor, to the leader at your place of worship, and to a funeral home ­ as well as placing them in your own files.


Myth: A fine wood casket lined in satin is a necessary part of a funeral.


Fact: A reinforced cardboard casket or a simple wooden container can be requested for burial or cremation.

Myth: You should use your will for funeral pre­arrangements.


Fact: Well, it's all in the timing. Funerals usually take place (including disposal of the body) less than a week after a person dies. The Will doesn't even get officially read until after the funeral has taken place! By then, it's too late ­ so a Will, in itself, is no guarantee that you will have the funeral you want.


Myth:   Embalming is necessary.


Fact: In most cases, NO. It's an old myth that's been scientifically disproved ages ago. But wouldn't that pose a health risk? Embalming is only necessary if a body has been three days without refrigeration. But funeral directors often insist on embalming, even under normal circumstances, if the body is to be viewed. This is because it makes the body more pliable, and easier to work with.

Myth:

Preplanning and prepaying for your funeral is foolish.


Fact: Planning for what will happen to your body after you die is doing a great favour to your family. The cost is locked in so that if prices go up, the cost is covered. The money is held in trust, and you will receive a contract that clearly itemizes all services with costs, guaranteeing that the prices quoted will not change.


Did you know... that Funeral Directors by law must provide you with an up­to­date price list free of charge?

AND TO ALL YOU SNOWBIRDS 
We recommend that you get to know the Memorial Society in the area where you vacation. Memberships are lifelong, and are transferable to any society across North America free of charge. Get all your questions answered now, and save your family the worry later (when they may not be in shape to make good decisions for you!)


Please click on the following link to see a satirical you tube video about the death industry.

Viewer discretion is advised! 
The major purpose of our organization is to give people information. We wish to preface your viewing of this video by saying that it does not reflect our view of all funeral directors. We have personally met many caring funeral directors who are honestly concerned about the welfare of their clients.








Myth: Leave your funeral arrangement plans in a safety deposit box.


Fact: The only person who can open the Safety Deposit Box of the deceased is ­ you guessed it! ­ the deceased. At least, not without some documentation, which usually comes, again, after  


 Funeral Arrangements   


DID YOU KNOW... that Dying With Dignity is an organization that provides papers called A LIVING WILL, to help you to document your decisions about what happens to you and your body as you are dying, and after death. They support "no heroic measures" to be taken medically to extend life for a person near death. 

Myth: Regarding organ donation, I get to say what happens to my body.


Fact: Your next of kin gets the final say. What happens to your body when you leave it (or are about to) is in the control of your next-of-­kin. If they don't agree with your wishes, their decision takes precedence over yours! If you choose to make a gift of part(s) of your body you are making a decision to save the life of someone you will never meet, or to significantly improve their lives. You need to know that your wishes will be respected. To do that, discuss the issue with your

MYTH: A do­-it­-yourself funeral is illegal.


Fact: In Ontario, it is legal! A do­-it­-yourself funeral, using either burial or cremation, is not a common occurrence, but if it's what you might be interested in, our organization can provide you with step­-by­-step instructions. 

family doctor, your loved ones, caregiver, or anyone who may be able to speak for you at the crucial time. Make sure you remind them all occasionally, so that they don't wonder if you've changed your mind over the years. Register your consent with the ​Trillium Gift of Life Network. 

So...communicate. Talk ­ and listen. Hear their concerns, and try to address them. Let them know how important it is to you, and to those whose lives you would like to save.